A famous neuroscientist investigates what happens inside the brain when one goes through a near-death experience

Near-death experiences are supposed to be horrifying, yet, they are not. People who undergo such experiences refer to them as peaceful events, and nothing could amaze the neuroscientists more. Near-death experiences are usually triggered by blunt trauma, a heart attack, asphyxia, shock, and so on.

Neuroscientists have pondered over this peculiar phenomenon for a long while without coming to any solid conclusions. Christof Koch, a famous neuroscientist, decided to dig into this matter and find an answer to a long-awaited question.

He began his research by going over historical accounts of near-death experiences. Even though a layman loves to relate this phenomenon to spirituality, Koch, however, came to a different conclusion. He discovered that when an individual goes through a near-death experience the core parts of his brain shut down, or as he states in his own language “they go offline”. Koch related such mental conditions to that of a person who decides to go mountain climbing or performs any other leisure activity.

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