Vaccine pushers suppress existing, approved, cheap medication that can reduce COVID infections by 70%
World News
By Admin - August 11, 2021

Vaccine pushers led by ‘experts’ like Dr. Anthony Fauci and NIH Director Dr. Francis Collins are continuing to suppress information about existing medications that have long been approved and are extremely effective at treating COVID-19 infections all because they’re obviously in bed with the Big Pharma CEOs who have become billionaires thanks to the emergency approval of their coronavirus shots.

One of those drugs is called fenofibrate, and British researchers have just published a peer-reviewed paper touting its effectiveness. The questions are, will the information get past the social media facists and will ‘experts’ like Fauci and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Director Dr. Rochelle Walensky tell the American people about it?

“A licensed drug normally used to treat abnormal levels of fatty substances in the blood could reduce infection caused by the SARS-CoV-2 virus by up to 70 percent, reveals a study in the laboratory by an international collaboration of researchers,” a press release published last week noted.

“The research team, led by the University of Birmingham and Keele University in the UK and the San Raffaele Scientific Institute in Italy, has demonstrated that fenofibrate and its active form (fenofibric acid) can significantly reduce SARS-COV-2 infection in human cells in the laboratory,” the release continued.

“Importantly, reduction of infection was obtained using concentrations of the drug which are safe and achievable using the standard clinical dose of fenofibrate,” it added.

The drug has already been approved for use in most countries and that includes the United States; the Food and Drug Administration, as well as the UK’s National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE), has approved it for oral use for treatment of conditions that include high cholesterol levels and to reduce lipids (fatty substances) in the bloodstream, thus lowering the risk for heart attacks and strokes.

Research proves drug’s effectiveness

“The team is now calling for clinical trials to test the drug in hospitalized COVID-19 patients, to be carried out in addition to two clinical trials also currently underway in such patients in research being led by the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania in the US and Hebrew University of Jerusalem in Israel,” the press release stated.

The research team explained how fenofibrate works to prevent COVID from seriously infecting people:

SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, infects the host through an interaction between the Spike protein on the surface of the virus and the ACE2 receptor protein on host cells. In this study, responding to the global COVID-19 pandemic, the team tested a panel of already licensed drugs – including fenofibrate – to identify candidates that disrupt ACE2 and Spike interactions.  

Having identified fenofibrate as a candidate, they then tested the efficacy of the drug in reducing infection in cells in the laboratory using the original strains of the SARS-CoV-2 virus isolated in 2020. They found fenofibrate reduced infection by up to 70%. 

Additional unpublished data also indicates that fenofibrate is equally effective against the newer variants of SARS-CoV-2 including the alpha and beta variants and research is ongoing into its efficacy in the delta variant.

“The development of new more infectious SARS-CoV-2 variants has resulted in a rapid expansion in infection rates and deaths in several countries around the world, especially the UK, US and Europe,” said one of the researchers, Dr. Farhat Khanim, of the University of Birmingham in the UK.

“Whilst vaccine programs will hopefully reduce infection rates and virus spread in the longer term, there is still an urgent need to expand our arsenal of drugs to treat SARS-CoV-2-positive patients,” Khanim added.

Dr. Alan Richardson, of Keele University in the UK, added, “Therapies are still urgently needed to manage COVID-19 patients who develop symptoms or require hospitalization.”

Additionally, Dr. Elisa Vicenzi, of the San Raffaele Scientific Institute in Milan, Italy, added, “Our data indicates that fenofibrate may have the potential to reduce the severity of COVID-19 symptoms and also virus spread.”

She went on to say that the drug is cheap, widely available in most countries, and would benefit low-to-middle-income persons the most — another reason why Big Pharma hates it as a COVID treatment.

Sources include:

Eureka.org

NaturalNews.com